IASblog

Notes from the Italian Art Society, promoting the study of the architecture and visual arts of Italy, from prehistory to the present day.
institutefinearts:

Lantern Slide: Monument’s Men, Crucifixion by Luca della Robbi in August 1944 after damages, at Impruneta near Florence, Commission for the Restoration of Italian Monuments, image gift of IFA alumnus Frederick Hartt

institutefinearts:

Lantern Slide: Monument’s Men, Crucifixion by Luca della Robbi in August 1944 after damages, at Impruneta near Florence, Commission for the Restoration of Italian Monuments, image gift of IFA alumnus Frederick Hartt

institutefinearts:

Lantern slide: Agostino Carracci (1557-1602), Deposition, Patrigi Collection, Rome, Photo by IFA professor Walter Friedländer

institutefinearts:

Lantern slide: Agostino Carracci (1557-1602), Deposition, Patrigi Collection, Rome, Photo by IFA professor Walter Friedländer

thegetty:

"Spend five minutes with this sarcophagus and you’ll witness a whole night—and a passionate one at that. Zeus, somewhat put out because Selene (goddess of the moon) had fallen in love with the mortal Endymion, cast the beautiful young man into an eternal sleep. But that didn’t stop Selene from visiting her beloved every night. You can see her at the center of this sarcophagus as darkness falls, stepping off from her chariot. But as you look to the right, beyond the slumbering Endymion, the next day begins to dawn (too soon!), and the horses must rush the goddess of the moon away, until the next evening’s amorous encounter." 

Recommended viewing for slowartday from our antiquities curator, David Saunders.

To zoom in and let your “eyes” wander, click here.

Sarcophagus panel (detail), about A.D. 210, Roman. Marble, 84 1/4 in. long x 21 3/8 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 

Ludovico Carracci was born on this day in 1555 in Bologna. Together with his cousins Anniable and Agostino, Ludovico helped transform Italian art from the decorative Mannerism popular in the mid-sixteenth century to the classicizing naturalism that came to dominate the early seventeenth century.  Like his cousins, Ludovico was deeply influenced by High Renaissance artists like Raphael, Correggio, and Titian. Unlike Anniable and Agostino, however, Ludovico preferred to stay in his native Bologna, where he ran the Carracci academy and had great influence on the next generation of Baroque artists, including Guido Reni, Francesco Albani, Domenichino, and Alessandro Algardi.

Reference: C. van Tuyll van Serooskerken, et al. “Carracci.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. Web. 4 Nov. 2013. <http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T014340pg1>

Further reading: Ludovico Carracci and the Art of Drawing by Babette Bohn (2005).

Male Nude (Hercules?), ca. 1588, black chalk on brown paper. Düsseldorf: Museum Kunstpalast

The Lamentation, ca. 1582, oil on canvas, New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Purchase, Lila Acheson Wallace and The Annenberg Foundation Gifts; Harris Brisbane Dick, Rogers, and Gwynne Andrews Funds; Pat and John Rosenwald, Mr. and Mrs. Mark Fisch, and Jon and Barbara Landau Gifts; Gift of Mortimer D. Sackler, Theresa Sackler and Family; and Victor Wilbour Memorial, Marquand, The Alfred N. Punnett Endowment, and Charles B. Curtis Funds, 2000.

Bargellini Madonna, 1588, oil on canvas, Bologna: Pinacoteca Nazionale.

Leon Battista Alberti died on this day in 1472 in Rome. Born in 1404 in Genoa to a Florentine family living in exile, Alberti spent his youth in Venice, Padua, and Bologna, where he studied canon law. Though best known today for his theories on painting, sculpture, and architecture, Alberti had a wide range of interests, including geometry, math, literature, ethics, and other subjects. He authored numerous texts on subjects ranging from the family to linear perspective. He also served as papal secretary to Eugenius IV, allowing him to return to Florence from 1434 to 1443. Alberti moved with the papal court to Rome and served Nicholas V and Pius II.

While Alberti’s work as a writer is uncontested, his work as an artist and architect is more elusive. A number of buildings and projects in Rome, Rimini, Florence, Mantua, and Ferrara have been attributed to him, but documentary evidence has not been found to substantiate most of the attributions. As Alberti was first and foremost a humanist, it is likely that he advised patrons, but unlikely that he did much practical work, leaving design and construction to sculptors and builders like Bernardo Rossellino, Matteo de’Pasti, and Luca Fancelli.

For more on Alberti as theorist and practicing architect, see Paul Davies and David Hemsoll. “Alberti, Leon Battista.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. <http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T001530>.

Matteo de’Pasti, Leon Battista Alberti (obverse); bronze commemorative medal, 1454–6 (Florence, Museo Nazionale del Bargello); photo credit: Scala/Art Resource, NY

Design attributed to Leon Battista Alberti, S. Francesco (‘Tempio Malatestiano’), Rimini, c. 1450–60

Self-portrait, bronze, c. 1435, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Attributed to Leon Battista Alberti, but likely Bernardo Rossellino, Façade of the Palazzo Rucellai, Florence, begun c. 1453; photo credit: Scala/Art Resource, NY

Design attributed to Leon Battista Alberti, but begun after his death, façade of S Andrea, Mantua; photo credit: Scala/Art Resource, NY

(Source: italianartsociety)

Happy Easter from the Italian Art Society! Today Western Christians celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus. Though not as common as images of the Crucifixion, the events of Easter appear frequently in Italian art. Recorded in all four Gospels, the Resurrection itself was not witnessed and therefore was not visualized by artists until the 12th century. The Noli Me Tangere — Do not Touch Me — and the Doubting Thomas, were other common images designed to celebrate the Risen Christ.

Piero della Francesca, Resurrected Christ, fresco, 1463-5, Pinacoteca Communale, Sansepolcro

Pietro Lorenzetti, Resurrection, c. 1320, fresco, Lower Church, San Francesco, Assisi

Fra Angelico, Resurrection of Christ and Women at the Tomb (Cell 8), 1440-42, fresco, San Marco, Florence

Vecchietta, The Resurrection, 1472, bronze, The Frick Collection, New York

Luca della Robbia, Resurrection, 1442-5, glazed terra cotta, Florence, Duomo

Michelangelo, The Resurrection (recto, detail), 1531-32, black chalk, traces of red chalk, Royal Collection, Windsor

Agnolo Bronzino, Resurrection, 1552, oil on canvas, Santissima Annunziata, Florence

Giotto, Noli me tangere, 1305, fresco, Scrovegni Chapel, Padua

Fra Angelico, Noli me Tangere, ca. 1430, illuminated manuscript, Missal 558, fol. 64v

Andrea del Verrocchio, Doubting Thomas, bronze, 1476-83, Orsanmichele, Florence

Word of the day: campare (Italian)

oupacademic:

v. To live.

image

Image credit: Running Dachshund at the beach By Dan Bennett. CC-BY-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Paolo Caliari, known as Veronese after his birthplace, died on this day in 1588 in Venice, where he spent the majority of his career. After training and early work in his native Verona, the artist moved to Venice in 1553, though he would continue to work for patrons throughout the Veneto. Alongside Titian and Tinoretto, Veronese dominated late Renaissance painting in the city on the lagoon, and was widely sought after for portraits, religious narratives, and mythologies. In addition to richly colored oil paintings, Veronese excelled in the medium of fresco like those painted for the Villa Barbaro at Maser. Veronese was famously brought before the inquisition for his on charges that his Last Supper, painted for the refectory of SS. Giovanni e Paolo in Venice, took too much artistic license with the biblical account. After his trial in July 1573, changed the title of his work to Feast in the House of Levi rather than change his composition to suit church officials.

Reference: Diana Gisolfi. “Veronese, Paolo.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press.<http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T089003>.

Deposition (or Lamentation), late 1540s, Verona, Italy, Museo di Castelvecchio; photo credit: Cameraphoto Arte, Venice/Art Resource, NY

Holy Family with St. Barbara and the Infant St. John, ca. 1565-70, oil on canvas, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

Giustiniana Barbaro and the wetnurse with the dog standing at a balconyc. 1561, fresco, Villa Barbaro, Maser, Italy; photo credit: SCALA/Art Resource, NY

Last Supper, renamed the Feast in the House of Levi, oil on canvas, 1573, formerly SS. Giovanni e Paolo, Venice (now Galleria dell’Accademia); photo credit: Alinari/Art Resource, NY

Mars and Venus United by Love, c. 1570, oil on canvas, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Venus and Adonis, 1580-82,oil on canvas, Museo del Prado, Madrid

Portrait of Daniele Barbaro, 1561-65, oil on canvas, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

Portrait of a Young Man Wearing Lynx Fur, 1551-53, oil on canvas, Szépmûvészeti Múzeum, Budapest

Caravaggio&#8217;s Denial of St. Peter commemorates the dramatic predawn Holy Friday event of the apostle&#8217;s denial of Jesus. Recounted in all four Gospels (Matthew 26:69–75; Mark 14:66–72; Luke 22:55–62; John 18:17–18, 25–27), Peter refused to acknowledge his discipleship, living up to Jesus&#8217; prophecy that he would deny him three times prior to the cock&#8217;s crow. Filled with shame and remorse, Peter wept bitterly at the realization that Jesus had predicted his sin, which Peter had promised would never happen. The penitent Peter thus became a powerful symbol of Confession and Penance.
Caravaggio, The Denial of St. Peter, before 1613, oil canvas, New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Herman and Lila Shickman, and Purchase, Lila Acheson Wallace Gift, 1997.

Caravaggio’s Denial of St. Peter commemorates the dramatic predawn Holy Friday event of the apostle’s denial of Jesus. Recounted in all four Gospels (Matthew 26:69–75; Mark 14:66–72; Luke 22:55–62; John 18:17–18, 25–27), Peter refused to acknowledge his discipleship, living up to Jesus’ prophecy that he would deny him three times prior to the cock’s crow. Filled with shame and remorse, Peter wept bitterly at the realization that Jesus had predicted his sin, which Peter had promised would never happen. The penitent Peter thus became a powerful symbol of Confession and Penance.

Caravaggio, The Denial of St. Peter, before 1613, oil canvas, New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Herman and Lila Shickman, and Purchase, Lila Acheson Wallace Gift, 1997.