IASblog

Notes from the Italian Art Society, promoting the study of the architecture and visual arts of Italy, from prehistory to the present day.

Italian artist Andrea Fantoni died in Rovetta on this day in 1734. Trained in his father’s workshop, Andrea worked as a sculptor, furniture-maker, and architect. A virtuoso wood-carver, Fantoni made elaborate furnishings for churches and private homes in Bergamo, Parma, and other northern Italian locales. The Fantoni workshop also produced works in marble and ivory. 

For more see: Maria Ida Catalano. “Fantoni, Andrea.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. Web. 19 Jul. 2013. <http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T027523>.

Portrait of Andrea Fantoni, Bergamo

Various works by Andrea Fantoni

(Source: italianartsociety)

Neoclassical architect Giocondo Albertolli was born on this day in 1742 in the town of Bedano in the Ticino region of Switzerland. Trained in Aosta and Parma, Albertolli worked widely in Italy including Tuscany, Rome, Naples, and Milan, where he became professor of design at the Brera Academy in 1776. He taught there until 1812 and died twenty-seven years later at the age of ninety-six.

Some of his most acclaimed works include the stuccoes decorating the Gran Salone at Villa Poggio Imperiale for Leopold, Grand Duke of Tuscany (1770-75), the Villa Melzi at Bellagio built for Francesco Melzi d’Eril, Duke of Lodi (1808-9), and the high altar of San Marco in Milan (1816). 

For more on Albertolli, see: Giuliana Ricci"Albertolli." Grove Art OnlineOxford Art OnlineOxford University PressWeb<http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/
article/grove/art/T001571pg1
>.

Carlo Gerosa, Giocondo Albertolli, oil on canvas, ca. 1835, Milan, Accademia di Brera

Salone delle Feste, Villa Poggio Imperiale, Florence

Villa Melzi, Bellaggio, Lake Como

Marble Portrait of Giocondo Albertolli (1742-1839), loggia of the Accademia di Brera, Milan

(Source: italianartsociety)

Word of the day: rimborsare (Italian)

oupacademic:

v. To pay back.

Image: Pocket money by Magnus D. CC BY 2.0 via Flickr.

gettypubs:

Advances for Display of Art in the Roman Palace, 1550–1750 have arrived! While many scholars have examined the sculpture, wall paintings, and tapestries found in Roman palaces of this period, this book offers a unique perspective on the way these art objects were integrated into the built environment. Display of Art in the Roman Palace, 1550–1750 can be preordered on our site. 

gettypubs:

Advances for Display of Art in the Roman Palace, 1550–1750 have arrived! While many scholars have examined the sculpture, wall paintings, and tapestries found in Roman palaces of this period, this book offers a unique perspective on the way these art objects were integrated into the built environment. Display of Art in the Roman Palace, 1550–1750 can be preordered on our site

On this day in 1844, artist Hermann David Solomon Corrodi was born in Frascati. Son of the Swiss painter Salomon Corrodi (d. 1892), Hermann studied first with his father and later at the Accademia di San Luca in Rome as well as in Paris in 1872. He maintained a studio in Rome, where he died in 1905. A noted history painter, Corrodi travelled widely and appealed to an international audience who appreciated his naturalism and exotic subjects. His patrons included members of the British royal family, and he made numerous etchings and landscapes as well as his history paintings.

Reference: Christina Steinhoff and William Hauptman. "Corrodi." Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. <http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T019625>.

Portrait of the artist, late 19th century

The Galata Bridge and the Yeni Valide Djami, Constantinople, oil on canvas

Campfire by the River: The Kiosk of Trajan at Philae

Campfire by the River: The Kiosk of Trajan at Philae, oil on canvas. New York: The Dahesh Museum of Art, 1995.20.

(Source: italianartsociety)

On this day in 1477, Francesco della Robbia was born in Florence. Son of the sculptor Andrea and great-nephew of Luca, Francesco learned the art of glazed terra-cotta that his great uncle and father had made famous in the early fifteenth century. Like his father, Francesco was a follower of the charismatic preacher Girolamo Savonarola (d. 1498), which perhaps led him to enter the Dominican convent of San Marco in 1495, taking the name Fra Ambrogio. Despite this pursuit of a religious life, he nevertheless stayed connected to the family’s glazed terracotta business and created a number of altarpieces, including the Nativity at La Verna. Despite his vows as a Dominican, he frequently collaborated with his brother Marco (b. 1468) and spent time with him in the 1520s working near Macerata in the Marches, where they created numerous glazed terracottas and helped to spread their famous technique across Italy.
Nativity, 1490s, glazed terracotta, Santa Maria degli Angeli, La Verna

Portrait of Girolamo Savonarola, 1498-1502, colored plaster in maplewood box, Museo di San Marco, Florence

On this day in 1477, Francesco della Robbia was born in Florence. Son of the sculptor Andrea and great-nephew of Luca, Francesco learned the art of glazed terra-cotta that his great uncle and father had made famous in the early fifteenth century. Like his father, Francesco was a follower of the charismatic preacher Girolamo Savonarola (d. 1498), which perhaps led him to enter the Dominican convent of San Marco in 1495, taking the name Fra Ambrogio. Despite this pursuit of a religious life, he nevertheless stayed connected to the family’s glazed terracotta business and created a number of altarpieces, including the Nativity at La Verna. Despite his vows as a Dominican, he frequently collaborated with his brother Marco (b. 1468) and spent time with him in the 1520s working near Macerata in the Marches, where they created numerous glazed terracottas and helped to spread their famous technique across Italy.

Nativity, 1490s, glazed terracotta, Santa Maria degli Angeli, La Verna

Portrait of Girolamo Savonarola, 1498-1502, colored plaster in maplewood box, Museo di San Marco, Florence

Portrait of Girolamo Savonarola, 1498-1502, colored plaster in maplewood box, Museo di San Marco, Florence

(Source: italianartsociety)

Word of the day: addormentato (Italian)

oupacademicSleeping.

Caravaggio, Sleeping Cupid, ca. 1595-6, oil on canvas. Indianapolis Museum of Art, The Clowes Collection, 2010.39

Venus, 1680s, marble, Galleria di Palazzo Reale, Genoa

Genoese sculptor Filippo Parodi died on this day in 1702. In addition to his hometown, Parodi spent over a decade in Rome and also worked in Venice and Padua. His work shows knowledge of Bernini and Puget, and his style was carried on by several students, including Pietro Roncaioli and   Giacomo Antonio Ponsonelli. Parodi created sculptural decorations for church altars as well as decorative works based on classical mythology. Like many Italian artists, Parodi moved easily between Christian and pagan themes depending on the desires of his patrons. He worked in a variety of media, including wood, stucco, and stone.

For more on Parodi, see Oreste Ferrari and M. Newcome. “Parodi.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/article/grove/art/T065548pg1.

Immaculate Conception, Altar, ca. 1700, marble, San Luca, Genoa

Candleabrum

(Source: italianartsociety)

philamuseum:

The Alessi website calls this cute corkscrew “a tongue-in-cheek homage to a real woman.” However, the curator of “The Main Dish" exhibition, Erica Warren, suggests a more literal translation involving the objectification of women: "She’s got her smiling face. Always ready to open that bottle of wine for you." What do you think?”Anna G.” Corkscrew, 1994, designed by Alessandro Mendini and made by Alessi, S.p.A.

philamuseum:

The Alessi website calls this cute corkscrew “a tongue-in-cheek homage to a real woman.” However, the curator of “The Main Dish" exhibition, Erica Warren, suggests a more literal translation involving the objectification of women: "She’s got her smiling face. Always ready to open that bottle of wine for you." What do you think?

Anna G.” Corkscrew, 1994, designed by Alessandro Mendini and made by Alessi, S.p.A.

On this day in 1414, Francesco della Rovere was born near Savona. He began his Christian vocation as a Franciscan friar and came to lead the order in 1464. Elected pope in 1471, he took the name Sixtus IV and commissioned numerous art and architectural projects at the Vatican and elsewhere in Rome. He is best known for constructing the papal palace chapel that bears his name. He built or renovated numerous several other structures in Rome. Among the most important were the church of Santa Maria del Popolo (1472-90) and the Ospedale di Santo Spirito in Sassia (1473-82), which can be seen as the backdrop of Sandro Botticelli’s Sistine Chapel fresco showing the Temptation of Jesus. The Ponte Sisto, a bridge over the Tiber that connects Trastevere to the Regola neighborhood, rebuilt the collapsed Pons Aurelius, which had spanned the Tiber at this point since Roman times. Sixtus died in Rome in 1484 at the age of 70.

For more on Sixtus IV as patron of the arts see: Hellmut Wohl and Sabine Eiche. “Rovere, della (i).” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. http://www.oxfordartonline.com/subscriber/
article/grove/art/T074235pg1

Melozzo da Forlì, Sixtus IV Appointing Platina as Prefect of the Vatican Library, ca. 1477, fresco, formerly Vatican Library (now Vatican Pinacoteca)

Sistine Chapel as it appeared in 1480, Apostolic Palace, Vatican City

Sandro Botticelli, Temptation of Christ, 1481-2, fresco, Sistine Chapel, Vatican City

Baccio Pontelli, Ponte Sisto, 1473-9, Rome

(Source: italianartsociety)